larry apke, agile doctor, team reflection

Agile Principles: Team Reflection Provides Growth

Retrospectives are my favorite of all the scrum activities because they represent the opportunity to reflect on how we are implementing and to adjust our behavior to be more effective.

I have said to my teams on many occasions that if I were forced to choose only one scrum ceremony that my choice, without hesitation or reservation, would be the retrospective. Without it, how could we ever expect to improve? What essential difference would an “Agile” project have over the many death march projects that teams have come to accept? Read More →


larry apke, agile doctor, simplicity

Agile Principles: Simplicity is Essential

In 2002, Jim Johnson of the Standish Group (made famous by their Chaos Report of software project “success”) presented findings of features and functions used in a typical system. The number of features that were never or rarely used totaled a whopping 64% while sometimes, often and always weighed in with 16%, 13% and 7% respectively. For those acquainted with the Pareto principle (80/20 rule), notice how the often and always used features – those things we should concentrate on building for our customers and those things things that bring us the most value – is exactly 80%.

In other words, a great deal of our effort is generally spent creating things that customers do not use or want. Read More →


larry apke, agile, scrum, indiegogo, agile development, agile doctor

Agile Principles: How to Maintain a Sustainable Pace

Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.

When I think on this principle I cannot help but think about the potential “dark side” of agile and how it can be misunderstood and implemented incorrectly. Read More →


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Agile Principles: Working Software is Primary Progress

Metrics. Metrics. Metrics. We love numbers. We measure and put numbers to all kinds of things. We use these numbers to mark our projects as red, yellow and red (of course, the project is always green until there are a few weeks left when someone finally blinks and acknowledges reality and begins to use yellow or, god forbid, red).

Unfortunately, in our headlong rush to create metrics we tend to forget the why of what we are doing. Numbers and statuses become an end unto themselves. Read More →


Agile Principles: Face to Face Conversations

The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and with a development team is face to face conversation.

Since there are so many misconceptions about miscommunication around agile, I created my business cards to contain the entire Agile Manifesto so that when people confuse scrum framework with agile philosophy or say, “This is agile blah, blah, blah,” I can hand them my card and say, “This is agile.”

Then I let them know that agile is nothing more than a philosophy, a series of values and principles. Read More →


larry apke agile doctor principles

Agile Principles: Motivation is the Key to Quality

If I had to take exception to any value or principle this would have to be the one.

While I have the utmost of respect for the original Agile signatories, they made a slight mistake because this principle refers to only projects. I have ranted often enough about the distinction between project and product management (See this post for more), but it is important to understand that Agile works best when we build a product (not a project) mindset. By having a principle that mentions projects might hinder folks from transforming their thinking to product-centric thinking. Read More →